The Follow-Up Thank You Email That Got Me Hired One Week After the Interview

The Follow-Up Thank You Email That Got Me Hired One Week After the Interview

The author sent a thank you email after interviewing at HubSpot, which resulted in being hired within a week, 20 days faster than their average turnaround time. Sending a thank you email after an interview can help candidates stand out in a competitive job market. A great thank you email should show appreciation for the interviewer's time and effort, and should be sent within 24 hours after the interview. The email should reiterate the candidate's interest in the role and company, recall an... ...interesting point from the conversation, and offer to answer any further questions. Researching the company and the people conducting the interview is crucial, with recruiters saying... ...that they would reject 47% of candidates who showed little knowledge about the company. Even the best interviews are stressful, so taking notes afterward can help recall important details that can be included in the follow-up email. Avoid sending generic or template emails, as they can feel impersonal and convey a lack of interest in the company. The follow-up email should be customized and detailed based on the interview conversation. It is beneficial to show your unique value in an authentic way, such as demonstrating how your personality matches the company's culture. The follow-up email should also ask smart, informed questions showing curiosity and interest in the company. Review your note before sending to ensure that it includes all necessary information and is addressed to the correct person. Customize your emails after each step in the interview process, as interviewers may share your emails during the decision-making process. Putting in a few extra minutes of thought and creativity into follow-up emails can make a significant difference in job applications. The final thank you email is just the beginning, and candidates should also be prepared for other decisions that come after hearing about the job offer.

#email#company#interview

The Looking Glass: The Power of the Mindmeld

The Looking Glass: The Power of the Mindmeld

The writer has always desired the ability to read minds, a superpower that they believe could greatly improve their work and personal life. The writer believes that perfect communication, akin to mind-reading, is essential for teams to work effectively towards the same goal. The concept of 'mindmeld' is introduced, which is the idea that all members of a team have the same understanding and vision of the project at hand. Lack of 'mindmeld' in a team can lead to issues like resentment, poor output, and office politics. When presenting new ideas, it's important to establish a shared foundation and define any technical terms precisely to avoid confusion. The presenter should also clearly explain the benefits of their new idea and how it contributes to the shared goal. The writer's experience of participating in National Novel Writing Month, a challenge to write a 50,000-word novel in November, helped them develop as a writer. The process of writing, regardless of whether the work is published or not, is beneficial for personal growth and clarity of thought. The writer believes that writing, reading, and thinking go hand-in-hand, and regular writing can have many advantages in life. The writer contributed to a Figma article, where they shared perspectives on judgement and context in design, reflecting on Brian Chesky’s talk. The writer offers paid subscribers additional resources on improving clarity, making memorable presentations, and understanding the limitations of AI summaries.

#writer#work#hand

The Looking Glass: You Cannot Teach Wisdom

The Looking Glass: You Cannot Teach Wisdom

The Looking Glass is a reader-supported publication that offers insights on product development and management. The blog post suggests seven key questions to ask when interviewing a prospective user of your product. The questions are designed to capture an eyewitness account, check table stakes, probe for... ...pain, research cost, determine the bar, gather potential visions, and test your thesis. The author asserts that wisdom cannot be taught; it is gained through personal experiences, growth, and introspection. According to the article, wisdom is like an elixir, which matures and gets better with time. The author suggests that clichés are containers of wisdom, which start off as shallow but become deeper and more meaningful with life experiences. The blog post emphasizes that wisdom is not something that can be passed on, but rather it is something that must be lived and experienced. The author also shares insights on the true measure of greatness, suggesting that it's... ...not about achieving a label but about creating things that meet one's own standards. An archived post on the blog discusses effective ways to pitch a product idea. It's important to describe the problem you're solving, consider how many people have... ...this problem, and present the solution in terms of experience, not the product. The author also stresses the importance of letting go of personal ownership of ideas and embracing a team approach. The author encourages paid subscriptions to support the publication and to gain access to subscriber-only content.

#author#product#wisdom