The Follow-Up Thank You Email That Got Me Hired One Week After the Interview

The Follow-Up Thank You Email That Got Me Hired One Week After the Interview

The author sent a thank you email after interviewing at HubSpot, which resulted in being hired within a week, 20 days faster than their average turnaround time. Sending a thank you email after an interview can help candidates stand out in a competitive job market. A great thank you email should show appreciation for the interviewer's time and effort, and should be sent within 24 hours after the interview. The email should reiterate the candidate's interest in the role and company, recall an... ...interesting point from the conversation, and offer to answer any further questions. Researching the company and the people conducting the interview is crucial, with recruiters saying... ...that they would reject 47% of candidates who showed little knowledge about the company. Even the best interviews are stressful, so taking notes afterward can help recall important details that can be included in the follow-up email. Avoid sending generic or template emails, as they can feel impersonal and convey a lack of interest in the company. The follow-up email should be customized and detailed based on the interview conversation. It is beneficial to show your unique value in an authentic way, such as demonstrating how your personality matches the company's culture. The follow-up email should also ask smart, informed questions showing curiosity and interest in the company. Review your note before sending to ensure that it includes all necessary information and is addressed to the correct person. Customize your emails after each step in the interview process, as interviewers may share your emails during the decision-making process. Putting in a few extra minutes of thought and creativity into follow-up emails can make a significant difference in job applications. The final thank you email is just the beginning, and candidates should also be prepared for other decisions that come after hearing about the job offer.

#email#company#interview

300+ Business Name Ideas to Inspire You [+7 Brand Name Generators]

300+ Business Name Ideas to Inspire You [+7 Brand Name Generators]

Business names are crucial to stand out in a crowded market. A unique business name separates your products and services from competition. The article provides several business name ideas to inspire entrepreneurs. A good business name should be descriptive, reflect your mission or values, and take into account what your prospects are searching for. Business names should be simple, fun or clever, demonstrate the value provided to customers, and be unique. The article provides steps to name a business, which includes understanding the business, thinking of descriptive keywords, considering SEO, choosing a name style, telling... ...a story, ensuring the business name is not trademarked or taken, verifying domain name and social media handle availability, and registering the business name. The article also provides examples of company names for inspiration. Business names should be memorable and easy to spell, pronounce, and recall. Incorporating keywords into the business name can help with ranking on search engines. It's important to verify that the business name isn't trademarked or already in use. The preferred domain name and social media handles for the business should also be available. Storytelling can be a powerful tool in business naming, as it can evoke specific thoughts and emotions. The article provides a list of business name generators to help entrepreneurs come up with creative names.

#business#names#article

Cram Down – A Test of Character for VCs and Founders

Cram Down – A Test of Character for VCs and Founders

Cram downs are a practice used by venture capitalists to provide more cash to struggling startups, but with unfavorable new terms for the founders. This practice was popular after the dotcom crash, and is making a resurgence due to changing economic conditions. Cram downs often involve re-writing stock agreements, forcing existing investors to participate... ...in the new financing or lose out, and can significantly devalue common shares. Venture capitalists justify this practice as their fiduciary responsibility or good business, however, it can be seen as abusive and usurious. Startups that are struggling to find product/market fit, generate sufficient revenue, or lack patient capital are especially vulnerable to cram downs. Founders agree to cram downs out of desperation to keep their company afloat, often compromising their ethical stance in the process. The article suggests that cram downs would not exist without the founder's agreement and encourages founders to consider walking away and starting afresh. The author argues that cram down funding is not a lifeline but a noose, as it often leaves... ...employees with little to show for their work and rarely turns around a failing business. Founders are advised to take time to consider alternatives, seek advice, and visualize what life might be like after their company ends. The article concludes by suggesting that if a founder is prepared to walk away, they might end up with a much better deal.

#downs#cram#practice